Turning Learning Right Side Up — Ackoff & Greenberg

Standard education systems are broken: Turning Learning Right Side Up points towards a way of fixing them. It argues that the current system of education was designed for purposes that no longer make sense. (Ken Robinson’s TED talk Do schools kill creativity? is the classic formulation of this problem.) Then this book talks about how education could be designed to help children become fully-rounded adults.

The emphasis is on learning rather than teaching, with children taking the initiative in their activities and even in the organisation of the school. This is already the norm at a few places, such as the famous Sudbury Valley School in the USA. It works well partly because a family that sends their child to such a school has probably already prepared them for this more independent style of education. I think it could work more generally, but it must start very early — children will need to grow up understanding that this is how schools work. Places like Playcentre in NZ get them started on the right track, with their philosophy of child-initiated play. We just need to continue this idea as they move through the education system.

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The regeneration projects of the past…

The regeneration projects of the past decade … appear to solve only the first-world problems of the monocultural… twitter.com/i/web/status/1037137987144798209

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“we took ordinary children and made…

“we took ordinary children and made them into liars, simply by telling them they were smart.”
Fixed vs. Growth: The… twitter.com/i/web/status/1029904415770071040

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The Road to Serfdom — Friedrich Hayek

“Freddie” Hayek is, of course, famous for the epic rap battles between him and his arch-nemesis, the maverick economist and Bloomsbury groupie John Maynard Keynes. Keynes may have been more charismatic, but Hayek had the edge in writing. The Road … Continue reading

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Consciousness: A Very Short Introduction — Susan Blackmore

This is a nice pocket-sized guide to consciousness. Actually it’s a guide to the problem of consciousness, since there is no consensus on what consciousness is or even exactly what the word means. Blackmore is even-handed regarding the various competing … Continue reading

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Towns and cities need social spaces….

Towns and cities need social spaces. www.nzgeo.com/stories/a-third-place/ #fb

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Happy Tau Day. Yes, pi is STILL wrong….

Happy Tau Day. Yes, pi is STILL wrong. tauday.com/ #tauday #tau #pi #fb via ifttt.com/recipes/414895-tweet-about-tau-day

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Demian — Hermann Hesse

Demian is very mysterious and alluring. This book is about him and his influence on the narrator — they first meet when they are both schoolboys. Demian then turns up repeatedly as the years go by, gradually taking the narrator … Continue reading

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Blink — Malcolm Gladwell

Snap judgements are surprisingly accurate. Even the ones we make without knowing how. Even the ones we make when we don’t even know we are doing it: “I just had a bad feeling about him, I can’t explain it”. This … Continue reading

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Zeustian Logic — Sabrina Malcolm

This story is more fun than you would think, given that it is about a teenage boy coming to terms with his father’s death. Astronomy and mythology are two of Tuttle’s boyish hobbies; they run like threads through the stories … Continue reading

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